HINDUISM AND SANATAN DHARMA

Cosmos ,Sanatan Dharma.Ancient Hinduism science.

Nature OF soul In Hinduism-Mindboggling facts.

From Ancient UFO-

MINDBOGGLING~Ancient Hindus Knew:Nature of the soul & Its Destiny

Some people ask for PROOF – SCIENTIFIC PROOF Must realise that today’s Modern day science is a MIDGET Technology when compared with Ancient Hindu Science/ Sanatana Dharma . Hindu Scripts already have every thing From ATOM to UNIVERSE and beyound that in Details .

27aef-soulanddestiny

Modern Science is just re-Discovering what Ancient Hindus already Discovered for many 100000s of Years ago . It will be laughable when you see the number I mentions more than 1 lacs years ago. But As I said this will also be proved correct when our Science and technology advanced as today we know VIMANAS were True because we advanced a bit closer to UFO technology .
Lets focus on ATMAN~ SOUL
Understanding Hindu Science ~ Ātman . Ātman (Hinduism), meaning ‘self’ is a Sanskrit word that means ‘inner-self’ or ‘soul’. In Hindu philosophy, especially in the Vedanta school of Hinduism, Ātman is the first principle, the true self of an individual beyond identification with phenomena, the essence of an individual. In order to attain salvation (liberation), a human being must acquire self-knowledge (atma jnana), which is to realize that one’s true self (Ātman) is identical with the transcendent self Brahman:
If atman is brahman in a pot (the body), then one need merely break the pot to fully realize the primordial unity of the individual soul with the plentitude of Being that was the Absolute.
The Vedanta philosophy discusses the
nature of the soul from two standpoints:1. Absolute or transcendental and
2. Relative or phenomenal.From the absolute standpoint, the soul is non-dual, immortal, ever pure, ever free, ever illumined, and one with Brahman. It is untouched by hunger or thirst, good and evil, pain and pleasure, birth and death, and the other pairs of opposites. That is the soul’s true nature. The realisation of which is the goal of a man’s spiritual aspiration and striving. From this absolute standpoint, the soul is called PARAMATMA or Supreme Soul.But from the relative standpoint, the Vedanta philosophy admits the existence of a multitude of individual souls called JIVATMAS, and distinguishes them from the Supreme Soul. Attached to the body, the individual soul is a victim of the pairs of the opposites. Entangled in the world, it seeks deliverance from the eternal round of birth and death, and with that end in view, studies the scriptures and practises spiritual disciplines.

The embodied soul is associated with the sense organs, the mind and vital breath (Prana). There are ten sense organs, all subordinate to the mind as the central organ; five organs of perception and five organs of action. The five organs of perception comprise the organ of taste (tongue),smell (nose), vision (eyes), hearing (ear), and touch (skin). The five organs of action are the hands, the feet, the organ of speech, the organs of evacuation and the organ of generation.

The four functions of the mind

The mind is the inner organ and consists of such functions as desire, deliberation, doubt, faith, want of faith, patience, impatience, shame, intelligence and fear.

The impressions carried by the organs of perception are shaped by the mind into ideas, for we see only with the mind, hear with the mind. Further, the mind changes the ideas into resolutions of the will.

There are four functions or divisions or parts of the mind.

One part of the mind called Manas, creates doubt.
The Buddhi (intellect) makes decisions
Chitta is the storehouse of memory
Aham (the ego), creates I-consciousness.
The five organs of action, the five organs of perception, the five pranas, the mind, and the intellect constitute the gross and the subtle body of the embodied soul (jiva). The subtle accompanies the individual soul after death, when the gross body is destroyed. The subtle body is the abode of the KARMA or impressions left by action, determining the nature of the new body and mind when the soul is reborn. As the jiva (the embodied soul) does and act, so it becomes.

The presence of an irrefragable Self or consciousness is assumed in all acts of thinking. The Self or consciousness, which is the true ‘seer’ or subject, is unchanging intelligence, and can never be imagined to be non-existent. Atman (the Self) in man and Brahman in the universe are completely identical.

The idea of body, senses, and the mind, associated with the non-self, is falsely superimposed upon the Self, and the Self, which is of the nature of pure consciousness, appears as a jiva, or phenomenal being, subject to the various limitations of the physical world.

Death, according to Hinduism, is a series of changes through which an individual passes. The Brihadaranyaka Upanishad describes thus the passing of a soul:
When the soul departs from the body, the life-breath follows: when the life-breath departs, all the organs follow. Then the soul becomes endowed with particularized consciousness and goes to the body which is related to that consciousness. It is followed by its knowledge, works, and past experience. Just as a leech supported on a straw goes to the end of it, takes hold of another support, and contracts itself, so does the self throw this body away and make it unconscious, take hold of another support, and contract itself. Just as a goldsmith takes a small quantity of gold and fashions another – a newer and better – form, so does the soul throw this body away, or make it unconscious, and make another – a new and better – form suited to the Manes, or the celestial minstrels, or the gods, or Virat, or Hiranyagarbha, or other beings. . As it does and acts, so it becomes; by doing good it becomes good, and by doing evil it becomes evil – it becomes virtuous through good acts and vicious through evil acts.

Hinduism speaks of the four courses that men follow after death. The first, called devayana, way of the gods, is followed by spiritually advanced souls who lead an extremely pure life, devoting themselves to wholehearted meditation on Brahman, but who have not succeeded in attaining complete Self-knowledge before death. They repair to Brahmaloka, the highest heaven, and from there in due course attain liberation. The description of this path in the Chhandogya Upanishad is as follows:

Now, such a one-whether his after-death rites are performed or not-goes to light, from light to day, from day to the bright half of the month, from the bright half of the month to the six months during which the sun rises northward, from the months to the year, from the year to the sun, from the sun to the moon, from the moon to the lightning. There he meets a person who is not a human being. This person carries the soul to Brahman. This is the divine path, the path of Brahman. Those proceeding by this path do not return to the whirl of humanity.

The second course, known as pitriyana, way of the fathers, is followed by ritualists and philanthropists who have cherished a desire for the results of their charity, austerity, vows, and worship. Following this path, they repair to Chandraloka, the lunar sphere, and after enjoying immense happiness there as a reward for their good actions, they return again to earth since they still have earthly desires. The third course, which leads to hell, is followed by those who led an impure life, performing actions forbidden by the scriptures. They are born in sub-human species. After expiating their evil actions, they are again reborn on earth in human bodies. The fourth course is for those who are extremely vile in their thoughts and actions. They are reborn again and again as insignificant creatures such as mosquitoes and fleas. Eventually, after the expiation of their evil actions, they too return to human bodies on earth. When a soul assumes a human body, it takes up the thread of spiritual evolution of its previous human birth and continues to evolve toward Self-knowledge. According to Hinduism, all souls will ultimately attain Self-knowledge. The four courses do not apply to those souls who attain Self-knowledge before or at the time of death. For these souls there is no going to any realm. Upon their death, their souls become absorbed in Brahman, and the elements of their body-mind complex return to their original source.

From the point of view of Hinduism, dying may be compared to falling asleep and after-death experiences to dreams. The thoughts and actions of the waking state determine the nature of our dreams. Similarly, after death the soul experiences the results of the thoughts it entertained and the actions it performed during its life on earth. After-death experiences are real to the soul, just as a dream is real to the dreamer, and may continue for ages. Then, when the soul wakes up after this sleep, it finds itself reborn as a human being. According to the Hindu scriptures, some souls after death also may be born as human beings without going through the experiences of heaven or hell. There is no real break in the spiritual evolution of the soul toward Self-knowledge. Even the soul’s lapse into sub-human birth from human life is a mere detour. A dying man’s next life is determined by his last thought in the present life. The Bhagavad Gita says: “For whatever objects a man thinks of at the final moment, when he leaves the body – that alone does he attain, O son of Kunti, being ever absorbed in the thought thereof.” And the last thought of the dying person inevitably reflects his inmost desire. These different courses after death have been described to warn people against neglecting the path of Self-knowledge, which alone can confer immortality and eternal peace and happiness.

3 comments on “Nature OF soul In Hinduism-Mindboggling facts.

  1. Pingback: Nature OF soul In Hinduism-Mindboggling facts. | HINDUISM AND SANATAN DHARMA – Voice of world

  2. Pingback: Nature OF soul In Hinduism-Mindboggling facts. | HINDUISM AND SANATAN DHARMA – GLOBAL HINDUISM

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This entry was posted on April 17, 2014 by in HINDUISM SCIENCE and tagged , , .

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